Connecting Sentences Using Connectives

The best way authors develop their writing and ensure that it is interesting is by varying sentence types. Any good piece of writing will include a mixture of simple, complex and compound sentences.  This article is going to focus on connecting sentences with connectives to help you develop your English language usage and work towards that great piece of writing you are striving for.  

DEFINITION

A simple sentence is a sentence that does not have any subordinate clauses.  Compound sentences are two simple sentences that are compounded to together with a connective.

CONNECTING SENTENCES WITH CONNECTIVES

Connectives That Are Commonly Used in Compound Sentences

Here is a list of the connectives that will be covered in this article. Instead of being used to start a sentence, these words work well at joining sentences together.

  • and
  • so
  • but
  • because

The ‘And’ Connective

Example 1

Here are two simple sentences.

  • ‘There was a duck. It was noisy.’
Connecting Sentences with Connectives- Simply Better English
Connecting Sentences with Connectives- Simply Better English

We can compound these sentences together to make one sentence.

  • ‘There was a duck and it was noisy.’

We used the ‘and’ connective to join the two sentences together.

Example 2

  • ‘I played the guitar.  My mum complained about the noise.’

Again, we can compound these sentences together to make one sentence.

  • ‘I played the guitar and my mum complained about the noise.’

As you can see, we use the ‘and’ connective to connect two pieces of information together. The two pieces of information are normally related in some way.

The two sentences below are simple sentences.

  • ‘I like tea. I went to the moon.’

If we were to use a connective, the sentence would become as follows:

  • ‘I like tea and I went to the moon.’ 

Although the sentence is grammatically correct, it does not make sense to put these two simple sentences together as the information is not connected in any way.

Remember: we use the ‘and’ connective to join two sentences that are related together.

Quiz Sign - Simply Better English
Quiz Sign – Simply Better English
Activity 1

Here are six simple sentences. Rewrite the sentences by putting those that relate to each other together. Use the ‘and’ connective to do this.

  • I went to a restaurant. I enjoy listening to rock music. I went to Ireland. I enjoy listening to classical music. I travelled by plane. The food there was tasty.

The ‘So’ Connective

Example 3

  • ‘Jack needed to dye his hair.  He went to the hair salon.’

Here we have two simple sentences with that can be joined with the ‘so’ connective:

  • ‘Jack needed to dye his hair, so he went to the hair salon.’

When writing and speaking in English, the ‘so’ connective is often used to tell the reader or listener that the second part of the sentence is a result of the first part.

CHOOSING BETWEEN CONNECTIVES

Sometimes, there are instances where you can choose between two different connectives.

Example 4

  • ‘Penny bought a phone. She called her mum.’
Connecting Sentences with Connectives- Simply Better English
Connecting Sentences with Connectives- Simply Better English

In this instance, the ‘and’ or ‘so’ connectives could be used.

  • ‘Penny bought a phone and she called her mum.’
  • ‘Penny bought a phone, so she called her mum.’

Penny calling her mum could be a result of her buying her phone. This means the ‘so’ connective could be used here too.

The ‘But’ Connective

Example 5

The ‘but’ connective is normally used to oppose a statement.

  • ‘I wanted to buy an ice cream. I had no more money in my purse.’

Here we have two simple sentences with opposing ideas. The sentences can be joined with the ‘but’ connective.

  • ‘I wanted to buy an ice cream, but I had no more money with me.’

The second part of the sentence tells us that the first part could not happen.

Example 6

  • ‘I wanted to continue reading. I had to go to bed.’

Again, we have two simple sentences which can be joined using the ‘but’ connective.

  • ‘I wanted to continue reading but I had to go to bed.’

In this example, it is clear that the individual wanted to read, but something stopped them.

Quiz Sign - Simply Better English
Quiz Sign – Simply Better English
Activity 2

Here are some simple sentences. Join them using the ‘but’ or ‘so’ connective.

  • They wanted to eat some chocolate. There was no more left.
  • I like to eat most fish. I do not like to eat haddock.
  • Terry wanted to eat apples. He bought some.
  • John had no furniture at home. He bought a chair.

The ‘Because’ Connective

Example 7

The word ‘because‘ can be used to provide a reason.

  • ‘I needed to go to the dentist.  My teeth were hurting.’
Connecting Sentences with Connectives- Simply Better English
Connecting Sentences with Connectives- Simply Better English

These simple sentences can be joined together using the ‘because’ connective.

  • ‘I needed to go to the dentist because my teeth were hurting.’

The second part of the sentence tells us why the person had to go to the dentist.

Example 8

  • ‘I needed to travel to work by train. My car needed to be fixed.’
  • ‘I needed to travel to work by train because my car needed to be fixed.’

Again, a reason is given for why the car could not be used. In this instance, the ‘because’ connective can be used.

Quiz Sign - Simply Better English
Quiz Sign – Simply Better English
Activity 3

Here are some simple sentences. Just like in the examples in this article, link them together with a connective. Find the correct connective for each sentence.

  • I wanted to go to the doctors. I was snowed in.
  • I sang at a concert. Everyone liked the song I sang.
  • I finished my homework.  I cleaned my room.
  • I liked the song. I played it again.

RECAP

This article looked at connecting sentences with connectives. Remember, if we connect two simple sentences together, it becomes a compound sentence. The connectives explored in this article are great to use when joining simple sentences together.

If you want help using the correct connectives in your writing, why not download Grammarly?

Here are the answers to the activities in the article. Feel free to leave your answers in the comment section.

Activity 1
  • I went to a restaurant and the food there was tasty.
  • I went to Ireland and I travelled by plane.
  • I enjoy listening to classical music and I enjoy listening to rock music.
Activity 2
  • They wanted to eat some chocolate, but there was no more left.
  • I like to eat most fish, but I do not like to eat haddock.
  • Terry wanted to eat apples so he bought some.
  • John had no furniture at home, so he bought a chair.
Activity 3
  • I wanted to go to the doctors, but I was snowed in.
  • I sang at a concert and everyone liked the song I sang.
  • I finished my homework and I cleaned my room. /I finished my homework, so I cleaned my room.
  • I liked the song, so I played it again. /I liked the song and I played it again

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